Water System Pipeline Cleaning Program

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Western routinely cleans its water system to help maintain high-quality water throughout our service area. In the water industry, this process is known as flushing. But simply put, it is water pipeline cleaning. 

Western's water system cleaning program removes sediment and mineral build-up throughout the distribution system and verifies the proper operation of the valves and hydrants. To learn more about Western's cleaning program and why it's necessary to continue these practices during a drought, read our frequently asked questions below.  

Current exploratory visual work 

Western Water is using advanced technology to perform visual inspections of the underground water pipelines using remote-controlled cameras.

To ensure a thorough examination, it will be necessary to temporarily interrupt water service. The interruption will occur from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 15 and Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024.

By employing remote-controlled cameras, we can achieve precise and accurate assessments.

Map for Oregon Trail and Robert Ct showing shutdown area



Current Pipeline Cleaning Project

Feb. 20 to Feb. 23, 2024

Pipeline cleaning work will occur from Feb. 20 to Feb. 23, 2024 in the below section of Murrieta. You may notice Western Water crews in the neighborhoods. They will move from hydrant to hydrant to help with unidirectional pipeline cleaning. There will be signage displayed as they are cleaning and will move from various sections throughout the map below.

Map showing pipeline cleaning activity in Murrieta, CA


Over time, natural sediments can accumulate in the large water pipes (also called mains) located beneath the streets. While these sediments are completely safe, they may affect water taste, color, and odor. Water main flushing is the process of cleaning the interior of the large water pipes and removing any accumulated sediment by sending a rapid flow of water through them. This rapid flow disrupts any sediment that may get in the mains over time, allowing us to filter and remove it. The water is discharged through select fire hydrants onto local roads or other surface areas.